Musings on Tetrationality

For many years I was part of the Anglican Church of Canada, attending services regularly and participating actively in parish life. Thus I heard, forty or fifty times a year, the ritual recitation of the “first and great commandment”, and the second “like unto it”, that I should love the Lord my God with all my heart, and with all my soul, and with all my mind, and with all my strength, and my neighbour as myself. I then joined my companions in beseeching God to write both these laws in my heart. I would like to think God did that for me; they certainly became written in my memory. I can recite them with becoming accuracy even today, more than twenty years after I ceased to be a regular attender.

I remember one sermon in which the preacher explained, concerning the second commandment, that we are not required to like our neighbours, only to love them; not more than ourselves, only as much as. I found that idea consoling, and still do. Lest you think I am suggesting that a narrow kind of self-love is consistent with the commandment, please note that if you follow the first part you will inevitably find the right perspective on the second. The two parts are perfectly blended.

This commandment is in fact a triad of loving: God, self, neighbour. What we can see happening all around us now, however, makes it abundantly clear that the time to make it a tetrad arrived with full force some time ago, and we had better get on with it. Borrowing phrasing from one of the two positive commandments on the old list of ten, we should set about asking God, or whatever sense of higher purpose we believe in, to write the following further commandment on our hearts, and give it status like unto the others:

HONOUR NATURE, MOTHER OF US ALL, AND LOVE HER TOO, THAT OUR DAYS MAY BE LONG IN THE LANDS WE ARE BLESSED TO INHABIT.

If we do not learn how to do that, and act accordingly, it appears we may find our days in the land shortened. Certainly they bid fair to be much more uncomfortable.

I have talked before, here or in other places, about the Leacock Tetrad of Knowledge + Imagination + Compassion + Humour, which I believe to hold considerable hope, perhaps the only hope, for lifting the governing Tetrad out of our hearts and putting it into action. I have tried to wrap the entire package of commandments, beliefs and casts of mind in simple symbolic form in the banner at the top of this blog. The colour bars come from Barnett Newman’s Voice of Fire. By laying them out horizontally, instead of vertically as the artist did, I am trying to admit the idea that the Voice must come from inside ourselves, that we cannot expect On High do all the work. On High has been voicing at us about these tetrads for some time, with little apparent effect except here and there, locally. Something is rotten, or at least deaf, in the Global Village.

I was moved the other day to speculate on why that might be happening. What voices are we listening to, telling us that the Voice of Fire, expressed in these Tetrads, can justly and safely be ignored? Perhaps they speak in tetrads too, such as the following, which for some reason came to me in adjectives, not nouns. Think of it as describing adverse casts of mind:

CONQUESTRIAN + CONSUMPTIVE + TECHNOLOGICAL + SCIENTIFIC

In other words, if the voice of this tetrad says anything, it would be that we are hoping that a combination of competition, consumption, technology, and science will get us out of the mess we are in, despite the obvious historical reality that they have played a huge part in getting us into it, or at least supporting us while we got into it ourselves. And if you think I am being a little hard on technology and science, then make a list of all the devices these actors have produced for us, and not only the wonderful beneficent ones, and ask yourself what it says,—the whole list,—about the cast of mind, the sense of direction, they bring to our search for well-being. They make tools for us. Marshall McLuhan tells us that first we shape our tools, then the tools take over and shape us. Do we really want to be shaped by some of those tools? Do they really have our best interests at heart?

I do not mean to suggest that competition, consumption, the invention of new tools, and rigorous specialized enquiry are wholly bad, only that we may be indulging too single-mindedly in them, too fast, without taking time to filter them through the whole Leacock Tetrad of

KNOWLEDGE + IMAGINATION + COMPASSION + HUMOUR

with the assistance of

DOUBT + HUMILITY + PLURALISM + INGENUITY

while giving full honour and respect to

GOD (higher purpose) + PERSONS (individual) + PEOPLE (collective) + NATURE.

Maybe this suggests another tetrad:

BALANCE + MODERATION + PATIENCE + TRANQUILITY.

Something along those lines, perhaps. What is a tetrad of tetrads? Two tetrads interwoven like the double helix of DNA might form an ogdoad. Four of them? A quadrupad?

PWC; January 21, 2020

Approaching Stephen Leacock’s 150th Birthday

Today is Wednesday, December 18th. In less than two weeks, on Monday, December 30th, we will celebrate Stephen Leacock’s 150th birthday with a party of friends, a cake, and an unveiling of the Unsolved Riddle of Social Justice as manifested in 2019. Stephen Leacock wrote a book about that in 1919, one hundred years ago, making 2019 another significant Leacock anniversary. The third was the 75th anniversary of his death, on March 28th. I have been celebrating his Anniversaries since that day, an endeavour that did not, I regret to say, go viral. It appears that Stephen Leacock, if not absolutely dead, is well along that way. Leslie and I know, of course, from our 2017 western tour, that there remain people who still find him interesting, rather more who still find him amusing, at least when he is at his best.

The writer of Ecclesiastes pronounced, many years ago, quite accurately as it turns out, that there is no end to the writing of books, and new writers can be forgiven if they prefer that the number of old books in circulation should be kept to a minimum. We can remember an old writer for his books, of course, if they are good enough, but perhaps a worthy alternative for some writers is to remember them for the seeds they planted. I think it entirely likely that I will never read another Leacock book, having read a great many during the several phases of this project. There are fifty-three of them; I have not read them all. From now on I will remember him, not for the few favourites that I find worth remembering, but for two seeds that he planted in my mind. I have been cultivating those seeds, and intend to continue, for their own sake, not for his, but primarily for the sake of my children, grand-children, and beyond, and for everyone else’s.

The two seeds are, first, the title of the book whose 100th anniversary I am celebrating:

The UNSOLVED RIDDLE of SOCIAL JUSTICE

It’s the title that matters most to me, not the book. I consider that Social Justice, widely conceived, is the greatest cause that humanity can and does pursue. Stephen Leacock identified it as an Unsolved Riddle, a type of ideal that is not to be answered with some pat “solution”, but to probed and wrestled with endlessly in the cause of improvement, or “progress” as it used to be called, and should continue to be called. Because when the world’s store of poverty, pain, misery, alienation, exploitation, oppression, violence, unnatural death, and other ills has been lessened, then that is progress, even if these ills persist. To identify Social Justice as an Unsolved Riddle is a huge, brilliant insight, a creative response to idealogues of all kinds, whose prescriptions have a nasty habit of increasing the ills, not the reverse. It is unfortunate that Stephen Leacock himself did not enlarge upon his insight, even in his book. That work remains.

The second seed grew out of my efforts to summarize the lessons he was trying to drum home to us in his fifty-three books, numerous individual pieces, public lectures, and lifetime of teaching about economics, politics, education, culture, and ways of life. The tools that he brought to his quest, and that he recommends to us, form a Tetrad:

KNOWLEDGE + IMAGINATION + COMPASSION + HUMOUR

One of my favourite passages in all of the literature I know is the opening to John Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress where the narrator, walking through “the wilderness of this world”, falls asleep and dreams of a man with “a great burden on his back”. Our burden comes with the benefits we have created for ourselves in our adoption of the industrial, commercial, technological, scientific, intricately interconnected way of life that brings us such a range of benefits. The burden is the costs that come with them, and the duty to deal with them for our own and the futures’ sakes. There is nothing wrong with wanting our lives to be prosperous, comfortable, secure, convenient, richly informed, and entertaining. We fool ourselves tragically when we can assume they can be that way without cost.

The Leacock Tetrad does not remove the burden, but has the capacity to lighten the carry, because these tools, taken together, will help us work to alleviate the costs without adding new ones, and to reassure us that we are doing the best we can. We are fated to muddle our way through the muddle we have ourselves created, because that is the nature of our creation. We all crave Social Justice, although we may vary somewhat in our definitions. Social Justice is an Unsolved Riddle. We cannot make it otherwise. Stephen Leacock is one of those people who gives us tools we need to work with it.

Who else? My current list: William Blake, Henry Thoreau, Herman Melville, George Eliot, Henry George, Northrop Frye, Marshall McLuhan, B.W. Powe, and now recently arrived Marilynne Robinson. More about them in the weeks and months ahead. I will also tell you about the œvirsagas and where they fit. Stephen Leacock had something to do with them too, or one of them at least. In Canada they are four in number, another Tetrad: Aboriginal, National, Political, and Urbanismal. They too are tools to grapple with the Unsolved Riddles and lighten the burden.

Ringing in the Tetrads

First posted October 21, up-dated October 29th. I have been running three blogs during the months of the Leacock Anniversaries, with different postings. This week, for a change, as I swing into yet another break, this one for two or even three weeks, I am posting the same text on all three.

This week’s pictoverbicon, as displayed on the Voyageur Storytelling web site (www.voyageurstorytelling.ca), the Leacock’n Bulletin linked thereto, and my Twitter page (https://twitter.com/conwaypaulw) introduces the Idea of Tetrational Thinking:

Leacock Post 10-31.jpeg

I have occupied much of the past two months in writing a book called The Marriage of Social Justice and Unsolved Riddles, in which I am attempting to convince readers that Social Justice and Unsolved Riddles belong together. The narrative approach that I adopted for this task I find subsequently to be consistent with Northrop Frye’s intention which was, according to his biographer John Ayre, “to spread imaginative poetic thought throughout society to soften and cancel the effects of procrustean logic and ideology.” This is most satisfying, because for a Canadian of my generation who graduated from the University of Toronto, to be consistent with Northrop Frye is always consoling.

I have talked before about Stephen Leacock’s Tetrad of Knowledge + Imagination + Compassion + Humour as a form of quadruple-thinking Both-Andian (or All-Andian) cast of mind able to work us toward Social Justice. When we pursue the Tetrational Way we find ourselves of course in a forest of Unsolved Riddles, that is, inherently conflicting or contradictory goods, but what is the alternative? How difficult would it be to tune our collective minds in all four of these directions at once? Quite difficult, I think, but possible with practice. Both Northrop Frye and Stephen Leacock insisted on Imagination as the linchpin of this whole way of thinking. That seems obvious, because the Tetrad demands that we step outside our normal, simplified, linear ways of thinking, the ones that enable us to get on with our lives from day to day without going mad, and view our lives together, our society, in a much more complicated way. In order to do that we have to free our imaginations from the “procrustean logic and ideology” which powerful forces press upon us so insistently.

One of the great Unsolved Riddles of our time declares the possibility that the simplified, linear thinking which helps us individually to avoid going mad from day to day, when applied collectively, to our social situation, constitutes itself a form of madness. I am convinced that Tetrational Thinking would ease the collective madness. We might too find that it creates an even higher form of sanity for us individually.

Reading Northrop Frye’s biography I learned that he set down a Tetrad of his own, although John Ayre does not tell us when or where Frye said it. “I think there has to be an assumption that life is better than death, freedom better than slavery, happiness better than misery, equality better than exploitation, for all men everywhere without exception.” (In the interests of exact quotation I leave in Frye’s “all men” and do not substitute “all people” or “everyone” as I feel strongly inclined to do, because that is obviously what Frye meant.) Is his assumption perhaps the irreducible first principle of Social Justice?

As an exercise in Tetrational Thinking, I invite you to stare fixedly at the following tetragammon (Is it a mandala? I’m not sure.) keeping in mind the four elements simultaneously. I have tried it, and find that it does in fact tend to break apart the procrustean logic and ideology.  When I have time I’ll create one for Frye’s Tetrad of Life + Freedom + Happiness + Equality, as well as its antipode, the Death + Slavery + Misery + Exploitation that is the tragic lot of so much of humanity and that we must never willingly accept.

tetrad-138-1.jpg

Stare at that Tetrad for a long time. Think about the words and what they mean both individually and for each other. Weave circles around them and close your eyes in holistic dream. Imagine them becoming more than they are, more than you ever dreamed they could be. Don’t become discouraged if nothing magic happens the first time you try. It will come.

When I resume posting here later in November I will take up these ideas more fully, both theoretically and practically. I shall strive to integrate the Tetrads of Stephen Leacock and Northrop Frye with B.W. Powe’s “attentive sensitivity to multi-dimensional meaning”, Isaiah Berlin’s “loose texture  and a measure of inefficiency and even muddle”, Marshall McLuhan’s gnomic utterance that “The Medium is the Message” (which I think means that how we think or communicate determines, or at least heavily influences,  what we think or communicate), and George Eliot’s celebration, in one of her characters, of a benign influence that is “incalculably diffusive”.

We are not machines. Our minds are not governed by sequential cause and effect. They can leap.

In the meantime I leave you with the following jingle:

The Mud between the Minds
Like muds of other kinds,
Constitutes a kind of wealth
Or viscous form of filth :
This is the Unsolved Riddle
Of the Muddle.